new rhinoceros from the late Miocene of Loperot, Turkana district, Kenya
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new rhinoceros from the late Miocene of Loperot, Turkana district, Kenya by Dirk Albert Hooijer

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Published by Harvard University in Cambridge .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Kenya,
  • Turkana.

Subjects:

  • Chilotheridium pattersoni.,
  • Paleontology -- Miocene.,
  • Paleontology -- Kenya -- Turkana.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statement[by] D. A. Hooijer.
SeriesBulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, v. 142, no. 3, Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology ;, v. 142, no. 3.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE882.U6 H74
The Physical Object
Pagination339-392 p.
Number of Pages392
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4559505M
LC Control Number77031353

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A new rhinoceros from the late Miocene of Loperot, Turkana district, Kenya Volume , Page Osteology of the Malaysian phallostethoid fish Ceratostethus bicornis, with a discussion of the evolution of remarkable structural novelties in its jaws and external genitalia.   The new species is placed in the genus Aceratherium and given the specific name porpani, in honour of Porpan Vachajitpan, who donated the specimens from which the species is described to the Northeastern Research Institute of PetrifiedWood and Mineral herium porpani is described from a largely complete skull and separate nearly complete mandible.   The middle Miocene site of Maboko (Lake Victoria, Kenya), dated to ca. 15 Ma, has yielded one of the best collection of rhinos in Africa. The most common taxon, Victoriaceros kenyensis , , is represented by an almost perfect skull (whose main features are the large nasal horn, an orbit located very anteriorly and with a prominent border, and very broad zygomatic Cited by: A new rhinoceros from the late Miocene of Loperot, Turkana District, Kenya. Article. Kenya, Late Miocene in age, represents a form distinctly more advanced than the genera and species known.

Rhinocerotid fossils from the lower upper Miocene Namurungule and Nakali Formations, northern Kenya, are described. These materials reveal the following diagnostic characters of Chilotheridium pattersoni: a strongly constricted protocone with a flattened lingual wall, a hypocone groove, a developed crochet, and an antecrochet curved toward the entrance of the medisinus. Specimens previously.   The site of Loperot in West Turkana, Kenya, is usually assigned to the Early Miocene. Recent discoveries at Loperot, including catarrhine primates, led to a revision of its mammalian fauna. Our revision of the fauna at Loperot shows an unusual taxonomic composition of the catarrhine community as well as several other unique mammalian taxa.   A new rhinoceros from Late Miocene of Loperot, Turkana District, Kenya. BulL Museum Comparative Zoo/ogy , HooiJer, D. A. V. J. A shovel tusked gomphothere from the Miocene of Kenya. Museum ofCompamt/ve Zoo~ gy, Breviora 3, D.A. HooijerA new rhinoceros from Late Miocene of Loperot, Turkana District, Kenya. People wonder if the second rhinoceros was the same as the first, but Jean declares that there were two different rhinoceroses: the first was an Asian rhinoceros with two horns, while the second was an African rhinoceros with one horn. Berenger insists that this is ridiculous since the rhinoceroses were moving too fast to count their horns.

  A volcanically preserved Rhinoceros skull from the Late Miocene of Turkey. Volcanic preservation is considered very unusual in Palaeontology. Ashfalls sometimes preserve tissues, and more often traces such as footprints or burrows, but contact with hotter volcanic material is extremely damaging to most organic matter, and therefore rarely seen.   The fossil tooth fragments from extinct rhinoceroses that lived million years ago have been found in Canada’s Yukon Territory. A remote region of west Turkana known as Loperot provides an exciting opportunity to study early Miocene primate paleoecology and has the potential to reveal the phylogenetic relationship between.   A new rhinoceros from the Nebraska Miocene by Lloyd G. Tanner, , University of Nebraska State Museum edition, in English.