Montrose lines: or, I"ll never love thee more
Read Online
Share

Montrose lines: or, I"ll never love thee more by Montrose, James Graham Marquis of

  • 842 Want to read
  • ·
  • 69 Currently reading

Published in [Edinburgh? .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEighteenth century -- reel 5309, no. 47.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 sheet
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16973368M

Download Montrose lines: or, I"ll never love thee more

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

I’ll laugh and sing at thy neglect, And never love thee more. But if thou wilt prove faithful then: And constant of thy word, I’ll make thee glorious by my pen: And famous by my sword; I’ll serve thee in such noble ways: Was never heard before; I’ll crown and deck thee all with bays, And love thee more and more.   MONTROSE’S LINE. My dear and only love, I pray that noble world of thee, Be govern’d by no other sway but purest monarchie; For if confusion have a part, which virtuous souls abhore, And hold a synod in thy heart, I’ll never love thee more. Get this from a library! Montrose lines: or, I'll never love thee more.. [James Graham Montrose, Marquis of]. I'll never love thee more. Or in the empire of thy heart, Where I should solely be, Another do pretend a part And dares to vie with me; Or if committees thou erect, And go on such a score, I'll sing and laugh at thy neglect, And never love thee more. But if thou wilt be constant then, And faithful of thy word, I'll make thee glorious by my pen.

2 quotes from James Graham, 1st Marquis of Montrose: 'He either fears his fate too much Or his deserts are small, Who dares not put it to the touch To win or lose it all.' and 'My dear and only Love, I pray This noble world of thee Be govern'd by no other sway But purest monarchy; For if confusion have a part, Which virtuous souls abhor, And hold a synod in thy heart, I'll never .   And love thee more and more. Montrose’s poem is full of noble and haughty sentiments. His patriotism is qualified by his abhorance of certain kinds of governance, both religious and secular – namely the hated synods and committees that deign to tell the monarch how to rule his country. How the Marquis of Montrose James Graham shaped history. I’ll never love thee more. Or in the empire of thy heart, Yet the Presbyterian faith was pulling him more strongly. Much later, Montrose would write: “Traitors we are not, to God, nor King, nor Country. Not to God because we stand or fall, by God’s assistance, for the Author: Hamish Macpherson. Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter, Making it light to Cassio. Cassio, I love thee. But never more be officer of mine.— Iago, I know you’re fond of Cassio and are downplaying this for his benefit. Cassio, I love you, but you’re never again going to be one of my officers.— Enter DESDEMONA, attended.

The “As Alexander he did reign” line was written by Montrose himself (“I'll never love Thee more”) And God who made The line in the poem from which this was copied (The Execution of Montrose, in the poetry book The Lays of the Scottish Cavaliers, by William Edmonstoune Aytoun) reads “And God who made shall gather them”. Maddy sings “that”, but it doesn't . An you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, For, by my soul, I’ll ne'er acknowledge thee, Nor what is mine shall never do thee good. Trust to ’t, bethink you. I’ll not be forsworn. Goddammit! It makes me mad. Day and night, hour after hour, all the time, at work, at play, alone, in company, my top priority has always been. ROMEO and BALTHASAR enter carrying a torch, pickax, and crowbar. ROMEO and BALTHASAR enter carrying a torch, pickax, and crowbar. What with a torch! Muffle me, night, awhile. Whoever it is is carrying a torch! I’ll hide in the darkness for a while. Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. [Takes them from BALTHASAR] 25 Hold, take this. I'Ll Never Love Thee More o MY dear and only Love, I pray That little world of thee Be govern'd by no other sway Than purest monarchy; For if confusion have a part (Which virtuous souls abhor), And hold a synod in thine heart, I'll never love thee more. Like Alexander I will reign, And I will reign alone; My thoughts did evermore disdain A rival on my throne.